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seas caused by the current fiscal environment. yesterday in boston, the nation began to pay tribute and final respects to those killed in last week's senseless violence. the collective hearts of our coast guard family go out to the people of boston and all the families that have been harmed by this tragedy. but they also go out because the coast guard is a part of that community in boston, and we were able to respond immediately with boats and cruise and armed helicopter, vessel boarding teams and overall enhancement of maritime transportation security posture. our ability to respond like this, not only in boston, but in all our ports, is a direct result of the support that we've received from the congress and the administration over the last 12 years. the results of that support were also demonstrated during hurricane sandy when we rescued 14 crewmembers from the sailing ship h.m.s. bounty in 30-foot seas and 60 knot winds 80 miles offshore. we're also part of the community in new york and new jersey, so we were pleased to be able to get the port running again after the storm and w
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. the immigration bill is hot and heavy, front and center. marco rubio did ginsburg in espagnole. he had five sunday shows, to talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. outink the guns may come not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. mexico, the united states, now japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance to help bring nafta into the 21st century. the three are very much on the u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. be second reason this will terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. doris meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our grea
, they may be hurting others. bank of america became some of the highlighting in a low-rate environment. sf servicing more loans and making less money from them. a report card for the good and the bad of the fed's low rates! the housing market, especially mortgage borrowers, have been the biggest beneficiary that began in 2008. close to 20 million mortgages have been refinanced since then. mortgage applications were up about 5% last week and the mortgage banker's association says the purchase index is at its highest level in two years. >> homes are just incredibly affordable because of these very low rate that is have been there to push down interest rates. >> low interest rates are getting consumerinto auto-showrooms. new car sales could top $15 million this year and negotia negotiating monthly payments that take away much of the new car sticker shock. both consumers and businesses are paying off or refinancing debt. consumer refinancing is at its lowest level in a decade. approximately $70,000 per household. >> we've seen corporations clean up their balance sheets even more so. they've ta
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
store and there are issues i have about consumer protection in that environment. while i appreciate, it is a concept that could work, we need strategies that are going to take into consideration varying factors and that the goal here, and in addition to being able to be in the black, is that, you have a public service and we have to serve these con at this time cents. i would really encourage you with your leadership on the board of governors to really think about ways that are going to be unique, more than just flexibility to get there. that you're looking at quality, connectivity, those relationships, the rural fabric in these states, related to the post office. when i was in inaing the postal service was a very effective partner in receiving those constituents, thank you. i yield back. >> thank you. and recognize the gentleman from mr. georgia. >> thank you, mr. chairman. just in listening and writing down notes, we went all over the map from the importance of postal service. i don't think anybody will detract from that. we talked before. you been in committees before. i serve an
there are that can do no wrong. so what qualifies as a company that can do no wrong in this environment? a couple of things. first, a company makes something with declining raw costs that it charges more for than it used to, and people have to pay that higher price because they have no alternative. and that's pretty much everything that sells at a supermarket or drugstore these days. think about it. what's the raw cost of a drug? virtually nothing. and what can they charge? virtually anything, as we see pretty much nightly these days on "mad money" when we have these execs on that talk about the huge prices they're charging. do you think celgene can't raise the price of revlimid, its breakthrough cancer drug? are you worried regeneron can't raise the price of eylea, an injectable medicine that can make you see again and requires fewer shots in the eye than the competition? i'm not that concerned. how about the toiletries? let's take head & shoulders, the terrific shampoo, not the terrifying chart pattern. the plastic bottle costs less than it used to because of the low price of natural gas courte
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
for a few hours and to institute special targeting rules both in the air environment and at the canadian border environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. with respect to fema, i can, when saw the response in boston and a coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november, boston held a massive exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event. and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercise is supported by the committee through fema to local areas, and again increasing our ability for response and resilience. we have worked with the fbi and ietotate lct ross e critical infrarurs d oprators, and we've been reaching out to faith-based organizations, community organizations and others who want to know what they can do. we are implementing a number of security measures, both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs within the maritime environment, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is provided security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing searches on terms of ground transporta
's another power we can use the environment. that is the power of persuasion. here we are lucky as both of us ex-prime ministers, he and i have met a whole bunch0s ceos and they should remember their patriotism and hire more, or pay more to their employees. it is -- for the first time in many years an increasing number of companies are willing to pay more. however, getting rid of denation -- deflation mindset alone cannot hamper long-lasting recovery. we most leave people with expectation to sustainable economic growth. and for the purpose we must have two downside risk. one, inflation without growth. two, interest rate hike without growth. let me understand one by one. let's assume that you now have rising cpi, but you have no pay rise. the economy is that is a bad inflation. people should suffer then. it is right here that the third bazooka should come into play. the third bazooka, if you recall, is a package of growth enhancement policies. i know it's hard to come by. i am not saying we can do very easily. still, it takes us only to look into miller -- into mirror to see who you are and th
environment for the exercise of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration of ngos as foreign agents but also restrictions on press and internet freedom act. so we've made clear our commitment to dialogue on human rights with the russian government, but we also remain actually committed to open dialogue with civil society and supporting their efforts. >> can i do a follow-up on that? i just wanted, i mean, the u.s. government has talked a lot about, concern about human rights abuses in chechnya. and i just wonder if you think the events in boston are going to change in any way the way the government will see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigationnbston, i just etars, that would be highly inappropriate to make further comment at this time. with respect to the situation in the northern caucasus, i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting. on russia and our country reports since 1995 you'll find quite a bit of information in this year's report. and they know serious human rights abuses taking place, and acts
of the larger faith community. >> the political environment is a lot different than in 2007 the last time congress took up an effort to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. right now we have evangelical leaders who have signed on and said, look, there's a religious imperative to embrace the stranger and to reach out and help people who are in our community. on the republican side, you have what they call a coalition of bibles, badges and business. you have faith leaders. you also have law enforcement leaders, attorney general from the states. and other sheriffs. and business leaders who are saying, look, our system is broken. its time to fix the system. on the republican side they're getting pressure from some of these core constituents to come up with a solution. >> ifill: is it fair to say after seeing his kind of tour de force on the sunday talk shows yesterday that senator marco rubio, the florida republican, is the face of this? or are there other... is there other agitation going on especially over in the house? >> marco rubio is seen as essential to presenting this bill to conse
. how do you see the regulatory environment playing out? and how are you going to improve margins in this scenario? >> actually, my margins improved by 140 basis points over the quarter. so we had a record margin for the first quarter. so over a 40% margin. i was asked specifically, can our margins even improve more, and i said, well, we have a lot of pressures on regulatory issues. we're reinvesting in our company by hiring more people. so i was just being cautionary. but to answer your question, our margins have had improved year after year. they're going to improve from 2012 into 2013. i believe our business model will allow margins to improve, despite, despite, we're spending at more money on lawyers, spending a lot more time working with our regulators. and i think this is just the cost of doing business moving forward. >> we'll leave it there. larry, always wonderful to have you on the program. thanks so much for your time. >> thanks, maria. >> larry fink, black rock. we have a market up 112 points. we are still waiting on answers coming out of boston in terms of suspects. w
is looking for right now. remember, the stocks that are consistently working this environment belong to companies that benefit from moderating commodity costs and can continue to raise or at least maintain prices on their customers. meanwhile, the company is doing very well. kimberly-clark just reported on friday and delivered a 3 cent earnings beat on $1.33 basis courtesy of solid organic sales, terrific growth and improving margins. plus the company also raises guidance for the full year and on top of that, kimberly-clark pays a healthy dividend which yields, and they have been a serial increase. can this stock keep outperforming like it's been doing despite the fact that many analysts don't think it can? let's talk to tom faulk chairman and ceo to hear more about the quarter and what comes next. mr. faulk, welcome to "mad money." >> boo-yah, jim. how is it going? >> going really well. thank you, tom. great to have you on the show. >> jim, let me tell you. your set has never looked better. you've got the finest products in the world there. and we hope you love the "mad money" kleen
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
. this is a report from environment energy news -- talk about the push back. guest: it is interesting that comes from this group. we were talking earlier about the impact -- host: between the majors and the independents? guest: exactly at would be the smaller companies that would feel the brunt of this if the tax code was adjusted. they put all drill that maxwell and there is fewer dollars, there will be less wells that were drilled. another argument they bring up -- we have discussed two tax preferences so far which are intangible drilling costs and percentage to live -- depletion and these are industries specific. they are only available to the oil and gas industry. the argument being made here is that they are similar to other tax preferences that exist in the tax code. that our = availabl to other industries outside of oil and gas. host: are the proposals on capitol hill to just target the major industries as opposed to these independent producers? guest: the president is targeting of the entire industry. certain pieces of legislation, notably from senator robert menendez from new jersey introduc
had -- they may not have had ieds but certainly have had high stress environments that kind of mimic a conflict. i'm thinking here about parts of the inner city or what is known as the inner city, cities like -- places like compton detroit, chicago a couple of years has been off the charts, parts of d.c. back in the '80s, parts of new york. so i mean -- i think there are high stress environments that mimic conflict zones. however, again i think this was different because this was -- we ignore what happens within our inner cities, within our urban centers and then in a way we ignore what happens in other people's cities and other people's foreign centers where we are active. and i think this was one moment that was broadcast all over -- all across the nation. it was all across the world. people were watching. all of a sudden, middle class americans, people who live in places like watertown they get a taste of what other countries -- what other people, what other parts of their own country have to go through. i don't think that it's crazy to -- the vocabulary that was used was the same
environment even more. i think you have a great, virtuous cycle that's kicking in. >> that cuts to the fundamental question about netflix whether it's growing fast enough to pay for the international expansion and to pay for the content bills that it's rack up. >> if you look in detail at these figures who which you have to still, the loss overseas is $77 million and the negative free cash flow is 42 million, tony. >> there are a couple of things that have gone on in this quarter. one, we do see these improvements in the use of accounts payable which in the cash flow and the u.s. streaming business scale better which should provide more cash flow and the dvd business is not declining as fast and these guys are managing the business pretty well. if i can on the international, it's down, but not down as much assy we expected and the way to think about that is maybe these international markets are getting to profitability sooner than expected and it may not be as big of a drag as people thought going in. they're focusing on traditional valuation in the near-term. i think what the s
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
political environments. another approach, one that we favor, is to lay out a better and clearer conservative vision of american society. the role of government, unlimited opportunity, of political self-government. rather than new principles, what we need are better arguments. and when you take those arguments -- we need to take those arguments to the american people. it is in that spirit that we welcome today's speaker to heritageouat mike lee is in th third year of his first term. that means more terms to follow. the first -- the third year of his first term as united states senator from the state of utah. his background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as
to better growth in the second half of the year. >> demand environment played out as we expected and i think the company executed well. as i just heard john say, we saw nice growth in our data center business. it was up 7% year on year. and within the overall market for computing, we're seeing nice growth and there's obviously a transition going on there. i think we're well positioned for that as well. >> intel shares closed up less than 1% and moving around after hours. also up a little less than 1% in frankfurt this morning which is no small feat considering germany's market is down by better than 1% as we speak. yahoo! first quarter rose and beat forecasts but revenue was flat and shy of estimates as the company feels the impact of declining web traffic and display ad sales fell for the second straight quarter down 11%. yahoo! is also projecting second quarter revenues that fell short of analysts expectations. ceo marissa mayer says her plans to reverse the trend is still on track and will show results in the second half of the year. she cautions it will be years before yahoo! grows at th
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
, will probably be here working well past the year 2050 and probably, in today's environment, past the year 2060. our current retirement model is designed to give an employee a defined pension after a long career and it's a model that made a lot of sense in the 19 40's and 1950's but is not going to be appropriate for the 20 40's and the 20 50's. our world is becoming far so dynamic to make promises about pensions 40 and 50 years down the road. the benefit of a defined contribution system is that it gives employees options to consider. if job changes are possible, why hold people to benefits that they may not be able to use for 50 years? e're currently on a trajectory to hit about 400,000 career employees by the year 2017 and that's with all the changes we propose, the six to five day and the network changes as we shrink down. and after we reach that number, it's going to give us a pretty lean work force. we have a pretty lean work force right now from the standpoint of the network and the six-day delivery. but after that we will start hiring people. we estimate between 2017 and 2027, depending
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. is hot andtion bill heavy, front and center. ginsburg indid espagnole. shows, toe sunday talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. i think the guns may come out not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. states, nowunited japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance. into thebring nafta 21st century. much on thee very u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. the second reason this will be terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our great experts. ted. , weseries of speakers today will have first ambassador med
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
is deeply troubling in an increasingly restrictive environment of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration as foreign agents and also restrictions on press and internet freedom. we made clear with human dialogue but we remain committed to open dialogue with civil seent supporting their efforts. >> i do a follow-up on that? >> sure. >> in the past -- i think the u.s. government has talked a lot about their concern of human rights abuse in chechnya. i'm wondering if you think the events in boston are going to change the way the government would see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigation in boston, i have to reiterate the secretary's comment that it would be highly norptse to make comments at this time. i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting on russia since 1995. you will find quite a bit of information on this year's report and they note serious human rights abuses taking place and human rights violations committed by authorities and militants. >> this is going to be the last question. >> you m
and present one we have to start tackling now rather than later. i am determined to facilitate the environment and basic conception tax rate, based on the provision of a comprehensive tax reform. you must also address japan's own entitlement reform to that the growth of the government expenditure in check. previously at the g20 meetings, together with other member nations we stick to it. wait a minute having the balance ratio to gdp by fiscal year 2015 than that in 2010. we also aim at achieving by 2020. we are going to publish medium-term fiscal consolidation plan around the middle of this year. the second interest rate hike is avoidable. economics should take deep root for the economically to seek sustainable growth. finally, before conclusion, let me say only a few words about what kind of country japan not to be. japan must be a place where the road needs effort. japan must be a place where risktakers can be given opportunities not just once, but many times. also, ex-prime minister present the chance for the second coming in japan. japan must be at face and a sense shotmaker cain mused, ja
environment. thank you, mr. speaker. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> i rise today to talk about the recent passing of dick falla, a great friend to working men and women of illinois and iowa, and a great ally to american workers. dick spent his life fighting to improve the lives of others. he was a tireless and passionate advocate for working families and true champion for civil rights. st's a lifel heght for local d national leader on half of the american worker he showed up at every labor rally, pickett line, and civil rights event. rain, snow, heat, old age, and sickness. nothing could deter dick from fighting on he behalf of working people. he was a rousing public speaker and inspired generations of illinoisans and iowans to get involved in public service. i know my husband, jerry, and i extend our condolences to dick's family. he will truly be missed. thank you, mr. speaker an
easily to $2 billion in savings. $4.5 billion and will be spent a day to operate in that environment. when in fact you cannot go on the street with the exception of the package delivery, which will be done with dynamic routing, with a lower-cost employee, whether in the rural craft or city craft and allow us to provide that service at a lower acroscost. that is all money that can come out of the system. if calculated in what we think is the revenue loss, and we have talked to customers to validate that. we are terms of that. that we clear something up. people say it is only $2 billion out of $20 billion. if we had it this year we would break even. this year we will lose $1.7 billion on the operating line. as revenue,-costs, with the exception of a worker's comp costs and pre funding. we would make money if we made the six to five move at the beginning of this year. what happens with a $20 billion of that gap exists when you do nothing over a five-year period, and with inflation that continues to grow. when people say it is only 10% of the cost differential, it is not, it would make u
't replace the wild west environment with a legal situation. >> let me ask another question. techis that the highest end. i'm thinking of a rhode island business that has a high technical level of accomplishment. they don't have a colossal hr department. they work in a particular niche, when they can identify the person they need as the person they need, there may be the person with a skill set like that anywhere to be found. if you need a specific profile in dover, does this give you the capability to reach outnd recrthat person? the concern i ve heard from these businesses ieven iyou have heard from this person and start recruiting them, it creates so much uncertainty and delay and havoc that if they have an international capability, they will go wherever -- to germany, india or china. are you comfortable we can compete with those kind of people where there is a specific person you are looking for? >> i think the bill seeks a number of important steps. is of the points you hit on just by going to brown, the ph going to a hospital. help, ashe numbers long as we avoidniend consequen
and energy activity in hat fast-changing environment. congress should ensure that the coast guard has the tools they need to do all we ask them to do. while our nation struggles with finding a responsible balance of fiscal restraint with a budget that meets our needs and responsibilities, i'm concerned about the nearly $1 billion reduction proposed in the coast guard fiscal year 2014 budget. last year we passed an authorization bill for the coast guard that authorized over $17 million more than the president's request would provide. it represented a
that hardworking employee. and we've got to remember that clearing this regulatory environment, it helps that american family. it helps that american family when they're sitting around their dinner table and they're trying to make life work. again, real quick, week of got a few more minutes. i just want to remind, mr. speaker, tonight we are hoping to receive input from our constituents at #makinglifework . throughout our conversation tonight we've been hearing from folks who have been reminding us of issues that are important to them and i think this is, mr. speaker, a very unique opportunity to have this onversation. ms. herrera beutler: we thank the gentlelady from alabama for putting this special order together and for really care being all americans and about what's important to them, as you said, sitting around the kitchen tables, it's about making life work. and at the end of the day, that's what government ought to be doing. getting out of the way, off their backs, working for the people, not against them. mr. gardner: i hope that tonight's conversation will continue, that it's n
audiences. but in the modern media environment people target small nations and how do i get young males or the latest women or black people? and some have decided to use prejudice, stereotypes to draw the audience to keep them on that platform. so what i try to do is explore that a little bit and describe what that is happening to help people diffuse these things so they can recognize and they see it on fox news, a msnbc or the drug report they have a sense of what is going on and they're made more media at aliterate and can respond in a way that made sense for growth. you made the term coded language? >> one of the great successes of the civil-rights movement be reached a point* where our racism is marginalized and demonize, rejected. when people want to talk in these ways to invoke prejudice is that they often end news coded language. they say something that comes close to what they mean. if you see newt gingrich running for the said g.o.p. and the one double talking about how more people on food stamps during the barack obama presidency and you can dispute that figure or not. but the
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